If I lived on the North side: Neighborhood may matter more than race in breast cancer survival rates

If I lived on the North side: Neighborhood may matter more than race in breast cancer survival rates

"Racial disparities in breast cancer diagnosis and survival rates may have more to do with neighborhood than race, according to a new University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign analysis. The study looked at patients ages 19 to 91 from breast cancer registries in six states, including Illinois. More than 93,600 black women living in big cities from 1980 to 2010 were included in the data set (approximately 14,000 from Chicagoland), which looked at neighborhood racial composition and segregation poverty rates and access to mammography.

The study found that residential segregation, defined as living in a neighborhood with a predominantly African-American population, significantly increased black women’s rates of late-stage diagnosis and doubled their odds of dying from breast cancer. White women living in predominantly African-American neighborhoods had comparable mortality rates."

Darcel Rockett | July 9, 2018

To read the full article, please click here. This piece appears in the Chicago Tribune.


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Ensuring Rural Kids are Part of the Health Equity Conversation

"People living in rural communities experience disparities in health outcomes that are avoidable, unfair and unjust. Rural children especially face socioeconomic, geographic and environmental barriers that influence their health conditions, outcomes and behaviors. Access to health care services plays a large role, but so too do intersecting shortcomings in physical infrastructure, broadband internet, transportation, housing, education and just economic systems. Rural children of color—particularly in the South, along the U.S./Mexico border and on Native land—battle discrimination, racism and marginalization that continues to contribute to the worst health disparities in our nation." This piece from PolicyLab offers insight into rural communities, providers and researchers that are partnering to care for children and families in rural areas.

Jennifer Whittaker Mup | July 05, 2018

This piece is from Children's Hospital of Philadelphia's Policy Lab Blog

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Early Childhood is Critical to Health Equity

Early Childhood is Critical to Health Equity

"The first few years of life set us on paths toward - or away from -  health and well-being in childhood and as adults. Experiences in early childhood - defined here as the first five years of life - are therefore critical to having a fair chance to be healthy across the lifespan." The second report in a series on health equity from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF), this report explores conditions in early childhood that shape health throughout life, how we can set all children on a path toward lifelong health, the business case for investing in early childhood, and a call to action. 

Read the full report from Robert Wood Johnson Foundation here.

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A Health Equity and Value Framework for Action: Delivery and Payment Transformation Policy Options to Reduce Health Disparities

A Health Equity and Value Framework for Action: Delivery and Payment Transformation Policy Options to Reduce Health Disparities

This policy options paper represents a collaborative effort among state and national health equity thought leaders to catalyze much needed action to leverage health system transformation for the benefit of those whom the health system is leaving behind. Ensuring that those facing the biggest barriers to good health and high-quality health care are served well by the health care system will improve care for everyone. 

Sinsi Hernández-Cancio, Ellen Albritton, Eliot Fishman, Sophia Tripoli, Andrea Callow | June 2018

This piece appears in Families USA: The voice for Health Care Consumers

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Untangling the Complex Issue of Health Equity in Michigan

Untangling the Complex Issue of Health Equity in Michigan

"Imagine this: Your child has tested positive for lead poisoning, so you request a city inspection of your home. At the same time, you receive an eviction notice. You follow up with the city to find out when the lead inspection will occur so you can use it to fight your eviction notice, but the city has canceled the inspection because of your eviction. In the same week, you have your second child, who will grow up in transitional housing after your eviction." This article is part of State of Health, a new series examining health disparities, how they affect Michigan's children and seniors, and the innovative solutions being developed to address them.

Sarah Rigg | June 21, 2018

This piece appears in Second Wave Michigan

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